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          GOOD
          Robert Reich / YouTube

          There's always some type of bickering that goes on between the generations and, these days, it's between Baby Boomers and Millenials. The Baby Boomers claim that Millenials are entitled. Which is pretty funny, because Millenials were raised by Boomers.

          On the other hand, Millenials believe that Boomer selfishness helped create a world where it's harder for younger people to get by.

          Regardless of who's right in the fight, the truth is that Millennials are on a much shakier financial footing than their parents.

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          Communities

          Media outlets love to compile lists of impressive people under a certain age. They laud the accomplishments of fresh-faced entrepreneurs, innovators, influencers, etc., making the rest of us ooh and ahh wonder how they got so far so young.

          While it's great to give credit where it's due, such early-life success lists can make folks over a certain age unnecessarily question where we went wrong in our youth—as if dreams can't come true and successes can't be had past age 30.

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          Culture

          In 2011, an earthquake and subsequent tsunami caused three reactors at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant to melt down. After radioactive material was released into the air, over 100,000 people were evacuated from an area roughly the size of Los Angeles. The area was then divided into three zones – one where people were permitted to return to, one where some areas were deemed safe to live, and one deemed uninhabitable due to the high levels of radiation. Almost ten years later, the wildlife in the area is thriving. Yes, even in the restricted areas.

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          The Planet

          Coal kills. The good news is that over the past 10 years, the U.S. has reduced its coal consumption by half.

          This reduction in coal consumption and the rise of cheaper and cleaner natural gas has resulted in 334 coal-power generating units being taken offline between 2005 and 2016.

          It has also caused a reduction in 300 million tons of planet-heating carbon dioxide gas emissions by the coal industry. According to a study published in Nature Sustainability, this drastic reduction in pollution has saved 26,610 American lives.

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          The Planet